KITCHER SCIENCE TRUTH AND DEMOCRACY PDF

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Our distribution centres are open and orders can be placed online. Do be advised that shipments may be delayed due to extra safety precautions implemented at our centres and delays with local shipping carriers. Oxford Scholarship Online. Available in Oxford Scholarship Online - view abstracts and keywords at book and chapter level. Closely examining some of our most deeply held notions about the role of science, distinguished philosopher Philip Kitcher engages the heated Closely examining some of our most deeply held notions about the role of science, distinguished philosopher Philip Kitcher engages the heated debate about how scientific knowledge should be pursued and employed.

Kitcher paints a pragmatic portrait of the sciences that allows for the possibility of scientific truth but nonetheless permits social consensus to determine which avenues need to be investigated. Oxford University Press is a department of the University of Oxford. It furthers the University's objective of excellence in research, scholarship, and education by publishing worldwide. Academic Skip to main content. Search Start Search. Choose your country or region Close. Dear Customer, As a global organisation, we, like many others, recognize the significant threat posed by the coronavirus.

Please contact our Customer Service Team if you have any questions. To purchase, visit your preferred ebook provider. Oxford Scholarship Online Available in Oxford Scholarship Online - view abstracts and keywords at book and chapter level. Science, Truth, and Democracy Phillip Kitcher Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Science Closely examining some of our most deeply held notions about the role of science, distinguished philosopher Philip Kitcher engages the heated Also of Interest.

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Philip Kitcher, "Science, Truth, and Democracy"

What should be the goal of science in a democratic society? Science, Truth, and Democracy attempts to provide a different answer. Yet science could not hope to find the whole truth about that world. Scientific inquiry must necessarily be selective, focusing on the aspects of nature that are deemed most important.

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Science, Truth, and Democracy

Science, Truth, and Democracy. Kitcher cuts a clear path between those who worship science as a religion and those who fashionably insist that science is merely a set of arbitrary constructs masking power and greed. Against the universal skepticism of post-modernism he argues that science does, indeed, produce knowledge. He phrases his affirmation carefully: "The success that people collectively enjoy in predicting the behavior of objects that exist independently of all of us and in adjusting our actions to them indicates that our most successful ways of representing the world are approximately correct. Just as the maps we make reveal the interests of our societies, so scientists, confronted with a potential infinity of things to study, "address the issues that are significant for people at a particular stage in the evolution of human culture. One risks reducing science to the pursuit of practical goals, leaving no space for fields like cosmology and paleontology. What, then, constitutes valuable scientific knowledge?

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