INVERTED PARADIDDLE PDF

The single paradiddle is an extremely popular rudiment and can be used in all styles of music. It is the simplest way possible of combining singles and doubles using both hands. Here is the single paradiddle written in its simplest and most common form. I have written the exercise so that the Right hand parts are played on the Hi-Hat and the Left hand parts on the snare drum. This is so you can hear what the different hand parts sound like when played together. All the notes should be evenly played and all at the same volume; the temptation is to play the first note of each four notes loudly.

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The single paradiddle is an extremely popular rudiment and can be used in all styles of music. It is the simplest way possible of combining singles and doubles using both hands. Here is the single paradiddle written in its simplest and most common form. I have written the exercise so that the Right hand parts are played on the Hi-Hat and the Left hand parts on the snare drum.

This is so you can hear what the different hand parts sound like when played together. All the notes should be evenly played and all at the same volume; the temptation is to play the first note of each four notes loudly.

When trying to play the paradiddle evenly it helps to play both hands on one drum source such as the snare drum , this allows the ears to notice any differences between the hands.

If you close your eyes while playing this on the snare drum it should sound like a single stroke roll RLRL i. This is harder than you might think! The paradiddle can be used within drum beats, as drum fills or used in a drum solo. The next three exercises are the same single paradiddle but simply moved along one note at a time. This simple idea, using the same sticking, allows the paradiddle to totally change its sound without the drummer having to learn any new stickings.

This version of the paradiddle gets its own name and is most commonly called the Inverted Paradiddle. It is my personal favourite as the single stroke part of the paradiddle flows into the down beat. For a really cool drum set application try placing the right hand over the floor tom and the left hand over the high tom for the single stroke part of the rudiment and play the doubles on the snare drum.

This is the least popular version of the single paradiddle due to the way the doubles flow into the downbeats. This variation when played through these subdivisions has the second note of the double landing on the perceived downbeat and so feels awkward and uncomfortable. This is only because it is probably the least practiced variation but, if mastered like the rest, not only feels comfortable but can also sound awesome! The next three exercises show some of the most common ways the single paradiddle is split over the drum kit.

For simplicity and ease of practice I have only used the standard paradiddle sticking RLRR LRLL but the ideas being shown can be applied to all four sticking variations. This is the most common and simplest way of applying the paradiddle to the rest of the drum kit. This version plays both of the single notes on different toms while the doubles are placed on the snare drum. I encourage you to memorise these three variations and to then play them next to each other without stopping.

Eventually you should be able to instinctively move your hands to toms within the single or double part of the paradiddle without hesitation or effort. Try to move in and out of the three variations randomly — see how they allow the freedom to move the hands to different drums. The next step is to try applying the same drums to the same parts of the paradiddle for all four sticking variations shown at the start of this lesson Inverted, Backwards etc. The next three exercises show just how much mileage can be gained from the paradiddle if mixed up and played around the drum kit.

These are just some examples within the multitude of variations possible and it is up to the drummer to come up with their own. What drummers will often find happening is that the sticking variations they practice the most tend to be played more frequently. The more sticking variations practiced the bigger vocabulary the drummer will have available to them.

Here is a cool idea that can be applied to all the paradiddle variations. The singles within the paradiddle are played on the crash cymbal with the bass drum. It adds an extra dimension to the possibilities. This drum fill helps to show just how the paradiddle stickings can be messed around with and at the same time, just how many possibilities there are. The first half of the bar uses the tom-toms while the second half incorporates the crash cymbal and bass drum shown previously.

I hope that this lesson has shown just how versatile the paradiddle can be. It is up to you what and how many sticking patterns you learn and how you use them around the kit. Simply start with the standard sticking and take it from there, explore for yourself how you can use the sticking to move around the kit and come up with your own ideas.

The Standard Single Paradiddle I have written the exercise so that the Right hand parts are played on the Hi-Hat and the Left hand parts on the snare drum. Variation 1 — The Inverted Paradiddle This version of the paradiddle gets its own name and is most commonly called the Inverted Paradiddle.

Variation 2 — The Backward Paradiddle This is simply the paradiddle played backwards; starting with the doubles. Moving The Paradiddle Around The Drum Kit The next three exercises show some of the most common ways the single paradiddle is split over the drum kit.

Single Paradiddle Around The Drum Kit — Variation 1 This is the most common and simplest way of applying the paradiddle to the rest of the drum kit. Single Paradiddle Around The Drum Kit — Variation 2 This version plays both of the single notes on different toms while the doubles are placed on the snare drum.

Single Paradiddle — Drum Fill 1 Here is a cool idea that can be applied to all the paradiddle variations. Single Paradiddle — Drum Fill 3 This drum fill helps to show just how the paradiddle stickings can be messed around with and at the same time, just how many possibilities there are.

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Inverted Paradiddle

Sticking for this rudiment that combines single and double strokes and is a variation on the standard paradiddle. The inverted paradiddle is a development of the Paradiddle and involves moving the double stroke into the middle of the blocks of four rather than playing them at the end. If you have spent a lot of time learning the paradiddle, this will be quite tricky as your brain will be trained up to play the paradiddle sticking. However, learning this rudiment on top of the standard paradiddle is incredibly good for your co ordination and will open up some new and very interesting ideas for groove and fill construction.

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Rudiments are generally some of the first things we all learn when we start our drumming journey. I found them tedious and boring at first, and honestly sometimes I still do. Rudiments can essentially be described as groupings of single and double strokes in different configurations and rhythms. One of my favorite rudiments is the inverted paradiddle-diddle, which is often commonly referred to as the six-stroke roll. Now you have a fun new piece of vocabulary to add to your grooves, fills, and solos. This rudiment naturally lends itself to a 16th-note-triplet subdivision with all six strokes living in the space of a quarter note.

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Inverted Paradiddle-Diddles

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