CRIME AND PUNISHMENT PEVEAR VOLOKHONSKY PDF

You will receive an email from our web orders team confirming that your order has been processed. We thank you for your support and your patience at this challenging time. Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in the St. Petersburg of the tsars, is determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammeled individual will. When he commits an act of murder and theft, he sets into motion a story that, for its excruciating suspense, its atmospheric vividness, and its depth of characterization and vision is almost unequaled in the literatures of the world.

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Previous page. Crime And Punishment. Mass Market Paperback. The Brothers Karamazov. The Idiot. Crime and Punishment: penguin Classics Deluxe Edition.

Next page. Review "The best [translation of Crime and Punishment ] currently available An especially faithful re-creation Don't miss it. It succeeds beautifully. The original's force and frightening immediacy is captured The Pevear and Volokhonsky translation will become the standard English version.

Fyodor Mikailovich Dostoevsky's life was as dark and dramatic as the great novels he wrote. He was born in Moscow in A short first novel, Poor Folk brought him instant success, but his writing career was cut short by his arrest for alleged subversion against Tsar Nicholas I in In prison he was given the "silent treatment" for eight months guards even wore velvet soled boots before he was led in front a firing squad.

Dressed in a death shroud, he faced an open grave and awaited execution, when suddenly, an order arrived commuting his sentence. He then spent four years at hard labor in a Siberian prison, where he began to suffer from epilepsy, and he returned to St. Petersburg only a full ten years after he had left in chains. His prison experiences coupled with his conversion to a profoundly religious philosophy formed the basis for his great novels.

But it was his fortuitous marriage to Anna Snitkina, following a period of utter destitution brought about by his compulsive gambling, that gave Dostoevsky the emotional stability to complete Crime and Punishment , The Idiot , The Possessed , and The Brothers Karamazov When Dostoevsky died in , he left a legacy of masterworks that influenced the great thinkers and writers of the Western world and immortalized him as a giant among writers of world literature.

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Review this product Share your thoughts with other customers. Write a customer review. Most helpful customer reviews on Amazon. Verified Purchase. It was the end of my freshman year of college and over the course of the last two semesters I had been introduced to a constant stream of new novels, authors and genres in and outside the classroom, accelerating me from an avid reader to a voracious one.

Dostoevsky loomed large over a lot of the writers I loved at the time: particularly Hemingway and Kerouac. So I was surprised by Bantam's pocket sized volume translated by Constance Garnett, which on scanning the first few pages, had the stiffly sophisticated tone I'd come to expect from 19th century novels and a compulsive readability presented in its breathless opening pages.

Plus, it was on sale for something like five bucks, so what the hell. I read rapturously over the course of a few summer days, carrying the book about in a back pocket, and finished it around 6 am one morning. It seemed to me everything that a really great novel should be: entertaining, thought provoking, beautiful.

A year of intro philosophy classes had convinced me I was some kind of original thinker, or at least a conscientious atheist. But Dostoevsky's take on spiritualism and religion gave me real pause; and despite a year's worth of railing against organized religion as the bane of all existence, the image of the murderer and prostitute reading the story of Lazarus together proved enormously powerful.

I can't think of many other books that have been read by so many people I've encountered and, maybe more astonishing, were deeply moved by it. Of course, there's always the stray dissenter. Vladimir Nabokov famously didn't think much of Dostoevsky, but then, he didn't like music either, so there's little accounting for taste.

I've become well acquainted with a good deal of Dostoevsky's subsequent work, along with the writings of his fellow countrymen, so I knew it was vital to pick up the translation by Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky and, having become addicted to my Kindle Paperwhite, downloaded the e-book so I could recreate the read-on-the-go experience should the book sweep me up a second time.

After all, tastes change, and in the past I have been dismayed by how radically my opinion of a fondly recollected novel can take a turn for the worse on rereading. But from the opening description of Raskolnikov descending from his crappy little apartment into the streets of St.

Petersburg I was hooked all over again. But while I found all the major plot points and characters had stuck in my brain through the years, I was surprised how much smaller the novel's scale seemed; sort of like visiting a house that seemed enormous as a kid but shrunk in scale on visiting as an adult.

In his introduction, Richard Pevear explains that Dostoevsky built the novel with the structure of theater in mind.

I doubt I would have made this astute observation on my own, and yet it became the unavoidable lens I reread the novel through. This philosophical bent tends to be the most common point of complaint amongst critics. Novels with a metaphysical agenda are often populated by flat characters who act as little more than mouthpieces for the author.

Rascolnikov, in particular, is much more an idea than a person, whose true crime is his modern intellectual arrogance rather than the murder which derives from his hubris. But Dostoevsky populates his novel with a supporting cast that creates an incredibly rich illustration of 19th century poverty, as well as the existential comedy and despair that would color the coming century.

The aforementioned Dostoesky hater, Vladimir Nabokov, believed that a serious reader is, in fact, a rereader. For a long time I've found myself almost panicked by the overabundance of books I want and feel the need to read, and disregarding a few exceptions which I've obsessed over, I have never defined myself as much of a rereader.

There's a magic that comes with reading Dostoevsky, and I cannot recommend the experience or reliving the experience enough. Does anyone comb through these reviews looking for actual discussions of the plot?

If so, I apologize - my rating is purely for this specific edition. I would recommend paying the extra money for this translation, or at least do some research on which translation would suit you - this didn't turn out to be my favourite book but I recieved a much deeper and smoother understanding of the time period, the actions of the characters, and the location than my friend with the lesser translation.

Each of us showed the other the science fiction novels we had written. His was entitled "Depravity" and besides the politics of the late '80s and early '90s, the most important influence on it was "Crime and Punishment.

Bill however was original enough to give his book a different ending than Dostoyevsky's. I lost touch with Bill after sending him a letter in about my own depravity.

He may be glad to hear I am not dead as I told him my conduct would probably result in my contracting HIV a ridiculous conceit on my part. Depravity is the real theme of "Crime and Punishment" but Dostoyevsky does not take a simplistic view of it.

As Solzhenitzyn would a hundred years later, he observes similar things about the admixture of good and evil within all of us. His protagonist Raskolnikov the name means "schismatic," not "rascal" in the English sense has tried his entire life to be good until he becomes an axe murderer at the end of part 1.

He takes money and valuables from his victim worth hundreds of rubles and instead of spending them, hides them, because it wasn't really about the money.

It was about proving to himself that he is a great man. Fortunately, Raskolnikov is surrounded by great-souled people. Even Svidrigailov gives away all his money and shoots himself rather than enter into another marriage of convenience or rape Raskolnikov's sister as he had intended at the beginning of part 6. These people, especially Sonya, whose heart is much bigger than the rest of her, eventually persuade him to do the right thing as he had done for most of his life.

Reading books like "Crime and Punishment" will remind us too to do the right thing. Five stars. Go to Amazon. Back to top. Get to Know Us. Shopbop Designer Fashion Brands. Alexa Actionable Analytics for the Web. DPReview Digital Photography.

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The Translation Wars

Constance Garnett. Poor Mrs. Translators suffer a thankless and uneasy afterlife. Or they never get that far: until the King James commission, English translators of the Bible were sometimes burned at the stake or strangled—or, as in the case of William York Tyndale, both. Translators are, for eternity, sent up, put down, nitpicked, and, finally, overturned. The objects of their attentions dread their ministrations.

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Crime and Punishment: Pevear & Volokhonsky Translation (Vintage Classics) (Paperback)

Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in the St. Petersburg of the tsars, is determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammeled individual will. When he commits an act of murder and theft, he sets into motion a story that, for its excruciating suspense, its atmospheric vividness, and its depth of characterization and vision is almost unequaled in the literatures of the world. The best known of Dostoevsky's masterpieces, Crime and Punishment can bear any amount of rereading without losing a drop of its power over our imaginations.

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Crime and Punishment

Look Inside. Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in the St. Petersburg of the tsars, is determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammeled individual will. When he commits an act of murder and theft, he sets into motion a story that, for its excruciating suspense, its atmospheric vividness, and its depth of characterization and vision is almost unequaled in the literatures of the world. Award-winning translators Richard Pevear and Larissa Volokhonsky render this elusive and wildly innovative novel with an energy, suppleness, and range of voice that do full justice to the genius of its creator. He was born in Moscow in

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Crime and Punishment: Pevear & Volokhonsky Translation (Vintage Classics)

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