AMOS TUTUOLA THE PALM WINE DRINKARD PDF

The first African novel published in English outside of Africa, this quest tale based on Yoruba folktales is written in a modified Yoruba English or Pidgin English. In it, a man follows his brewer into the land of the dead, encountering many spirits and adventures. The novel has always been controversial, inspiring both admiration and contempt among Western and Nigerian critics, but has emerged as one of the most important texts in the African literary canon, translated into more than a dozen languages. The Palm-Wine Drinkard, told in the first person, is about an unnamed man who is addicted to palm wine , which is made from the fermented sap of the palm tree and used in ceremonies all over West Africa. The son of a rich man, the narrator can afford his own tapster a man who taps the palm tree for sap and then prepares the wine. When the tapster dies, cutting off his supply, the desperate narrator sets off for Dead's Town to try to bring the tapster back.

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The first African novel published in English outside of Africa, this quest tale based on Yoruba folktales is written in a modified Yoruba English or Pidgin English. In it, a man follows his brewer into the land of the dead, encountering many spirits and adventures. The novel has always been controversial, inspiring both admiration and contempt among Western and Nigerian critics, but has emerged as one of the most important texts in the African literary canon, translated into more than a dozen languages.

The Palm-Wine Drinkard, told in the first person, is about an unnamed man who is addicted to palm wine , which is made from the fermented sap of the palm tree and used in ceremonies all over West Africa. The son of a rich man, the narrator can afford his own tapster a man who taps the palm tree for sap and then prepares the wine.

When the tapster dies, cutting off his supply, the desperate narrator sets off for Dead's Town to try to bring the tapster back. He travels through a world of magic and supernatural beings, surviving various tests and finally gains a magic egg with never-ending palm wine. In , the Africanist literary critic Bernth Lindfors produced an anthology of all the reviews of Tutuola's work published to date.

Given these Western reviews, it is not surprising that African intellectuals of the time saw the book as bad for Africa, believing that the story showed Nigerians as illiterate and superstitious drunks.

It was only later that the novel began to rise in the general estimation. Critics began to value Tutuola's literary style as a unique exploration of the possibilities of African folklore instead of the more typical realist imitation of European novels in African novels. One of the contributions Tutuola made was to "kill forever any idea that Africans are copyists of the cultures of other races.

Tutuola was no more ungrammatical than James Joyce or Mark Twain , whose use of dialect was more violent, others argued. Well aware of the criticism, Tutuola has stated that he had no regrets, "Probably if I had more education, that might change my writing or improve it or change it to another thing people would not admire.

Well, I cannot say. Perhaps with higher education, I might not be as popular a writer. I might not write folktales. I might not take it as anything important. I would take it as superstition and not write in that line.

My purpose of writing is to make other people to understand more about Yoruba people and in fact they have already understood more than ever before. Although The Palm-Wine Drinkard is often described as magical realism , the term was not invented until , after the novel was published. Kool A. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the work of African literature. For the Kool A. This article relies largely or entirely on a single source.

Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. Please help improve this article by introducing citations to additional sources. Categories : novels Fantasy novels Nigerian English-language novels Nigerian magic realism novels Novels set in Nigeria Faber and Faber books debut novels.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Contribute Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. First edition UK. My Life in the Bush of Ghosts.

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The Palm-Wine Drinkard and His Dead Palm-Wine Tapster in the Deads’ Town

In my opinion, they belong to the same genre of the surreal. The narrators find themselves on a fantastical, adventurous journey where strange and unimaginable things happen. The Drinkard consumes kegs of palm-wine a day and into the night, ever since he was ten years old. Water has never touched his lips, and when his palm-wine tapper dies, he sets out on a journey to find and bring him back from the dead. Passing through the bush and strange towns, he encounters monsters, mythic creatures, ghosts, and manages to trick and trap death, and also rescues a beautiful girl—who becomes his wife—from a terrible creature in the jungle. He has a bag of witchery that enables him to survive and defeat the many enemies he meets.

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Amos Tutuola and “The Palm-Wine Drinkard” revisited

Audiences are craving the next big fantasy epic. And amid criticisms that Game of Thrones was too white , what better way to answer that craving than by setting an epic in a mystical African past? They are, however, indebted to the late Nigerian author Amos Tutuola, who wrote the fantasy The Palm-Wine Drinkard in , the first novel written in English by a West African writer about an African subject. His compelling narratives and inventive mixture of traditional folklore with wholly unique supernatural elements offers a lot to contemporary readers. I fell in love with Tutuola immediately. The opening lines of The Palm-Wine Drinkard offer an excellent glimpse into why:. I was a palm-wine drinkard since I was a boy of ten years of age.

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